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Despite everything we still adhere to the belief that a tax system should be based on a broad base and low rates. Tax everything — a little. That system minimizes economic distortions, makes compliance and administration easier, and ultimately raises more revenue. And political machinations distorting this ideal don’t work.

The latest example of the government’s failure to influence the economy comes from Wisconsin. The Wisconsin Budget Project, a small but fierce outfit in Madison, released a study recently that shows the state’s manufacturing and agriculture credit (MAC) did little to boost the economy or create jobs. We don’t always agree with the folks at the project. Indeed, we rarely agree with them. But they deserve a lot of credit for this study.

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While the words “gift” and “taxes” don’t seem like they belong in the same sentence, they do — and the gift tax can definitely matter to you.

Most people know certain gifts are excluded from income tax.  Currently, you can give $14,000 per year ($28,000 per year as a couple) to an individual or individuals without paying tax on the gift.  And typically the recipient does not owe taxes on the money received.

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The 8 Rules of Dividend Investing systematically rank the best dividend growth stocks for long-term investors so you know exactly what stocks to buy and sell.

All of The 8 Rules are supported by academic research and ‘common sense’ principles from some of the world’s greatest investors.

The 8 Rules of Dividend Investing are more than just ideas…

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The landmark judicial ruling permitting same-sex couples to marry also opens up benefits that they can now use together. Paola Ramos, a financial advisor with a Hewins Financial Advisors subsidiary, explains how to navigate the system:

The Supreme Court’s decision in Obergefell v. Hodges last year held that same-sex couples have a constitutional right to marry in all U.S. states. As a result of this ruling and other changes in state and federal laws in recent years, same-sex couples across the country now have greater access to many of the benefits that opposite-sex couples have enjoyed for years.

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With less than a month left to go until doomsday…er, tax day… everyone could use some fun facts about taxes to lighten the burden of what can be a lot people’s least favorite time of year.

Here are 10 surprising facts about what it means to be a taxpayer in the United States.

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If you are a small employer, there is a tax credit that can put money in your pocket. The small business health care tax credit benefits employers that:

offer coverage through the small business health options program, also known as the SHOP marketplace; have fewer than 25 full-time equivalent employees; pay an average wage of less than $50,000 a year; pay at least half of employee health insurance premiums.

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Planning for a successful financial future can be an overwhelming proposition for many of us, as there is often a lot at stake and one misstep could lead to major implications down the road. Factor in that every penny counts when it comes to a hard-earned retirement, as well as not wanting to overpay in unnecessary taxes and it’s a lot to think about!

In order to simplify the retirement process and to get the most out of our money, we need to think about our assets from a tax standpoint and their placement in different buckets. Buckets represent the different ways that money gets treated from a tax standpoint. We need to think about which bucket we are putting things in, as that makes a big difference in a

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Very few people start out with a huge trading account, but with a steady, thoughtful process it is achievable. Trading in an account of $25,000 or less requires a different approach than trading with a larger account. Here are the 10 Commandments of Trading in a Small Account that are sure to make your trading more profitable, less risky, and far less stressful:

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Splurging on a new iPad or subscription to GlossyBox might be tempting when your tax refund shows up. But before you start hitting the buy button, consider using some of the money to protect what you already have.

The average 2015 tax refund is about $3,100, according to the IRS. That’s enough to beef up insurance protection and emergency savings and perhaps still leave you with some extra cash for fun.

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